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Nelson-Atkins Museum says it cuts 36 jobs due to pandemic

KELLY. KATIE THANK YOU. WELL ANOTHER RESTAURANT IN KANSAS CITY CLOSES FOLLOWING THE PANDEMIC THE RIEGER AT THE CARREFOUR ANNOUNCED SATURDAY THAT IT WOULD CLOSE ON NOVEMBER 1 IN A POST FACEBOOK. THEY SAID IT NO LONGER MAKES FINANCIAL SENSE TO OPERATE THE RESTAURANT WAS OPENED NEARLY A DECADE AND WORKED AS THE CARREFOUR COMMUNITY KITCHEN SERVING 85,000 MEALS TO THOSE IN NEED WHEN THE PANDEMIC BEGUN THE RESTAURANT SAYS THEY COULD REOPEN IN THE FUTURE. AVAILABLE. FROM A 19 PANDEMIC LEFT MANY AMERICANS IN FINANCIAL STRUGGLE IN SEPTEMBER ACCORDING TO THE MORTGAGE BANKING ASSOCIATION IS THE RESEARCH INSTITUTE, MORE THAN 6 MILLION AMERICANS HAS NOT MADE PAYMENT TO THEIR HOUSE. THOUSAND DOLLARS A YEAR, BUT IT ENDS DECEMBER 31 WITHOUT ANOTHER CONVENTION STIMULA SOME ECONOMISTS fear these payments will leave Americans homeless next year. WYANDOTTE COUNTY HEALTH OFFICERS ARE MOVING THEIR COVID-19 TESTING SITE FROM MONDAY. THE SITE WILL BE AT THE FORMER KMART LOCATION ON STATE AVENUE. THE PERMANENT FACILITY WILL BE OPEN FROM MONDAY TO FRIDAY 9TH TO 3 HEALTH MANAGERS. SAY THAT THIS NEW SPACE IS BIGGER AND CAN ACCOMMODATE MORE PEOPLE. REMEMBER ALL ST. LUKE’S HPITALS ARE HOSTING AN INFLUENZA MARATHON THIS MONTH FOR PATIENTS WITH ST. LUKE’S PRIMARY CARE DOCTOR CAN MAKE AN APPOINTMENT. WHICH TAKES PLACE IN ST. LUKE’S KANSAS CITY SOUTH NORTH AND EAST VENUES THE EVENTS TAKE PLACE FROM 9:00 AM TO 3:00 AM EVERY SATURDAY AND SUNDAY. YOU

Nelson-Atkins Museum says it cuts 36 jobs due to pandemic

Officials say PPP loan, reallocation of funds will not be enough to cover lost income

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art said on Wednesday it was cutting 36 jobs due to the pandemic. The museum closed its doors to visitors, except essential staff, on March 14 and reopened on September 12. , the ticket office, the Rozzelle Court restaurant, parking fees and the sale of merchandise during this period. Even though the museum is now open, officials said attendance was significantly lower. The museum said it was forced to cancel all traveling exhibitions, in-person tours, classes, public programs and festivals. As a result, Nelson-Atkins will have to cut his budget by 25%, to around $ 26 million. These reductions, in turn, require staff reductions of 15%, or 36 positions. “Any decision to downsize the staff should be the last resort. Nelson-Atkins staff members keep our institution’s mission thriving and ensure the museum is a cultural treasure in Kansas City,” said Richard C . Green, Chairman, Nelson-Atkins Board of Directors. “Sadly, we are not immune to the same forces that businesses and other nonprofits have faced during this difficult year. These steps are being taken to ensure the long-term sustainability of the museum. ”The museum said it was successful in securing payroll protection. Loan program and also worked with long-time donors to reallocate funds that were previously limited However, these were not enough to cover the loss of income caused by the pandemic-related shutdown, museum officials said.

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art said on Wednesday it was cutting 36 jobs due to the pandemic.

The museum closed to visitors, except essential staff, on March 14 and reopened on September 12.

Officials said the museum lost revenue from event rentals, fundraising, ticketing, the Rozzelle Court restaurant, parking fees and merchandise sales during this time.

Even though the museum is now open, officials said attendance was significantly lower. The museum said it was forced to cancel all traveling exhibitions, in-person tours, classes, public programs and festivals. As a result, Nelson-Atkins will have to cut his budget by 25%, to around $ 26 million. These reductions, in turn, require staff reductions of 15%, or 36 positions.

“Any decision to reduce the size of the staff must be the last resort. Nelson-Atkins staff members advance the mission of our institution and ensure that the museum is a cultural treasure in Kansas City, ”said Richard C. Green, Chairman of the Nelson-Atkins Board of Directors. “Sadly, we are not immune to the same forces that businesses and other nonprofits have faced during this difficult year. These steps are being taken to ensure the long term sustainability of the museum.”

The museum said it was successful in securing a loan from the Payroll Protection Program and also worked with long-time donors to reallocate funds that were previously limited. However, these were not enough to cover the loss of income caused by the pandemic-related shutdown, museum officials said.